Stack Setup

Create Stack

There are two ways stacks can be arranged: Regular and Staggered. For either method, begin by selecting the part and clicking the create-stack-button.jpg button. Bases are recommended when creating any stack.

Regular

In this method, you will input X, Y, and Z counts for an array of stacked parts.

  1. Each part/combined set of parts acts as a cell of an array of parts that will duplicate struts and supports. Inputting a Count value will add that number of cells on the X, Y, or Z axis.
  2. Distance values indicate the distance between the centers of the parts.

Roll over to zoom.regular-stack.jpg

  1. Use the Count and Distance inputs to create your stack.
    1. The image at the right shows a sample array of cells (dots). Notice that the stack preview shows your initial part/cell with its neighboring parts in X, Y and Z. Use the models in this preview to assist in visually nesting the parts.

    2. You can also drag each neighbor part to a desired location instead of adjusting distance values.

    3. The blue dots indicate that the stacked parts will fit within the build area, while the red dots indicate they will not fit.

    4. Start off with a large value in Z Count as the stack will automatically ignore any part/cell that have a red dot. Then change the Z Count value to the required number.

    5. Input large values for X and Y Count past the platform and then go to Top View.

    6. Drag parts around until you get a desired nesting.

Roll over to zoom.CreateStack_1.JPG
Array demonstrating stacked capacity on a Figure 4

  1. Click on Set Base, and then select the base file that was brought in earlier during build setup

    NOTE: This base will be printed directly on the print platform.

    NOTE: The base will scale to the size of the XY part boundary, not to the whole platform.

    1. The Margin field indicates the distance between the boundary of the part and the edge of the base.
      1. A margin of 0 mm means that the base is the size of the part boundary. The larger the margin is, the smaller the base is.
    2. The Clearance field indicates the distance between the bottom of the first-row parts and the base.
  2. Click on Set to apply the Stack generation.
    1. An I-beam like connector piece will connect between the centroids of each part/base.
      1. Notches are created in the middle of each base connector piece in case you would like to break up your stack pre- and post-curing in order to post-process parts according to your preferences.
      2. Base connectors do not extend into the base itself.
      3. You can use struts from the base to the part to create a more-rigid structure; but the struts connected to the base will not be replicated with each cell.
  3. If any changes need to be made to the stack generation, such as spacing between parts, click on the stack and click on Create Stack to edit.

NOTE: When you re-edit a stack, any struts made on the stack will be erased.

stack-base.jpg

Staggering

In this method, you will still input X, Y, and Z counts for an array of stacked parts (Steps 1-3 in the Regular section, above). However, when you click Stagger, the parts will shift every other row.

  1. In the example at the right, the second row shifted half the distance between two of the parts in the X-direction. For some geometries, this makes it easier to nest parts more closely.

  2. Useful for medium-sized parts that are larger than 35 mm (in the Y-direction). Otherwise, you would only be able to create a stack in the X-direction 

  3. This feature can help you when cleaning printed stacks because the spacing in between parts allows for better flow for cleaning solvents to pass through.

Roll over to zoom.stagger-stack.jpg

Base

In this method, you will follow either the Regular or Staggering workflow; and you will add in a custom STL file that can be used as a base on which to stack your parts. This base will be printed directly on the print platform without supports.

  1. Click the Set Base button and select the STL file that was initially imported during build setup, or select one of the pre-installed 3D Sprint templates.
  2. The Margin field indicates the distance between the boundary of the part and the edge of the base.
    1. A margin of 0 mm means that the base is the size of the part boundary. The larger the margin is, the smaller the base is.

    2. Avoid having the bases intersect. 

  3. The Clearance field indicates the distance between the bottom of the first-row parts and the base.
  4. An I-beam like connector piece will connect between the centroids of each part/base.
    1. Notches are created in the middle of each base connector piece in case you would like to break up your stack before or after curing in order to post-process parts your way.

    2. Base connectors do not extend into the base itself.

    3. You can use struts from the base to the part to create a more-rigid structure; but the struts connected to the base will not be replicated with each cell.

Roll over to zoom.
build-base.jpg
Notch in between base connector pieces