Part Specifications Overview

When planning and setting up parts to print, there are many factors to consider. This section will describe some basic limitations and guiding principles.

NOTE: The following parameters all assume an optimal printing environment. Variations in temperature and humidity may affect accuracy.

Part Weight vs. Strength

Lighter parts handle more easily in terms of reducing the risk of breakage. You can reduce the weight of an object by reducing the size of features from the top-down, or by thickening features from the bottom-up. For example, a wine glass would not be the best self-sustaining structure for the Culinary Printer because its thin stem must support the weight of the heavier top. In this case, you could apply a thicker stem to support the weight.

Small Features:

Small, sharp or protruding features will print on the Culinary Printer in most cases, but should generally be avoided, due to their tendencies to fracture during post processing and part handling. When possible, create contrast with color rather than with small or sharp-edged protruding features.

Bounding Box

The bounding box is the confines in which your Culinary Printer can build 3D parts. The maximum (A) a part can be built is 9.3 x 8.6 x 8 in. (236.31 x 218.4 x 203.25 mm), while the minimum (B) is 10 x 10 x 10 mm (0.4 x 0.4 x 0.4 in.). bounding-box-06032020.jpg

Wall Thickness

"Walls" on your printed part refer to the outer-most solid layer of a hollow or thin part. Walls in your 3D model must meet minimum measurements to ensure that they survive printing and post processing. Walls that are too thin are prone to warping during printing and are fragile during post-processing. There are two types of walls:

Supported Wall (red arrow) - A wall that is connected to the rest of the part on at least two sides. The minimum width for supported walls is 2.0 mm (0.08 in.).

Unsupported Wall (green arrows) - A wall that is either free-standing, or only connected to the rest of the part on one side. The minimum width for unsupported walls is 3.0 mm (0.12 in.).

The minimum spacing between parallel walls like these is 1mm (0.04 in.).

suported-wall.jpg

Wires

Wires on your printed part refer to a section that is thinner than it is long. Wires in your 3D model must meet minimum measurements to ensure that they survive printing and post processing. There are two types of wires:

Supported Wire - A wire that is connected to the rest of your part on at least two sides. The minimum width for supported wires is 2.0 mm (0.08 in.). supported-wire.jpg
Unsupported Wire - A wire that is either free-standing, or only connected to the rest of the part on one side. The minimum width for unsupported wires is 3.0 mm (0.12 in.). unsupported-wire.jpg

Surface Details

Surface details refer to artistic details such as engraved or embossed features. Surface details in your 3D model must meet minimum measurements to ensure that they print/process as intended.

Embossed details - Minimum width/length measurements are 0.5 x 0.5 mm (0.02 x 0.02 in) (1). The embossed dots at the far right of the image (2) are too small to print effectively.

The recommended embossing height (outward distance)(3) is 0.5 - 1.0 mm (0.02 to 0.04 in.)

embossed-pattern.jpg
Engraved details - Minimum width/length measurements are 0.5 x 0.5 mm (0.02 x 0.02 in) (1).The embossed dots at the far right of the image (2) are too small to print effectively.

The recommended engraving/debossing depth (inward distance)(3) is 0.5 - 1.0 mm (0.02 to 0.04 in)

embossed-logo.jpg

Text

Consider the following when adding text to your parts:

  1. For best results, the text should be oriented on the upward-facing or side-facing surface of a part. Avoid the downward-facing surface.
  2. When creating text, apply a font color that contrasts the rest of the part. If you do not want the text embossed or engraved, use an embossed or engraved distance of 0. This will create text that is flush with the part surface, and that will be the most legible and easiest to post-process.

Embossed Text

Minimum font size - 5 mm size (approximately equivalent to 12 pt). Arial bold font is recommended.

Recommended height (outward distance) - 0.5 - 1.0 mm (0.02 - 0.04 in)

debossed-text.jpg

Engraved Text

Minimum font size - 5 mm size (approximately equivalent to 12 pt). Arial bold font is recommended.

Recommended depth (inward distance) - 0.5 - 1.0 mm (0.02 - 0.04 in)

embossed-text.jpg

Escape Holes

Escape holes are holes through which excess powder can drain out of a hollow part in post processing. This can be a useful method to lower part weight, use less binder, or create a different mouth feel for the part. You can choose to leave part sealed and leave the unused powder inside part. However, creating escape holes and draining the powder will yield powder that can be used again in the printer. When creating escape holes, keep in mind the wall thickness where the holes are, as well as the ease of draining the hole during post processing. Create all drainage holes on the same side of the part, using multiple holes if the part surface is big enough. Then in post processing, use the Finishing Station to blow air into one hole and force powder out of the other(s). Use the following recommendations when creating escape holes. escape-holes.jpg

In a part with a single or multiple escape holes, the hole's diameter must be at least 3 mm (0.1 in.) but recommend 5mm (0.2 in.), assuming 2 mm (0.08 in.) thick part walls. Keep in mind the distance between your escape holes and how that may affect structural integrity of your part.

single-escape-hole.jpg
multiple-escape-holes-06052020.jpg

 

Shaft

The minimum diameter of a shaft of 10 mm (0.4 in.) high should be 5 mm (0.2 in.)

cylinder.jpg

Clearance

Clearance refers to the minimum spacing required between parts in the build bed in 3D Sprint. The minimum spacing is 4 mm (0.15 in.) for non-moving parts at 2 mm (0.08 in.) of thickness. Depending on part geometry, this spacing can be as low as 3 mm (0.12 in.).

parts-spaced-2mm.jpg

Interlocking and Enclosed Parts

As long as the clearance between parts is greater than the minimum stated above, it is possible to make interlocking parts. Clearance (see above) for these parts should be 2 mm (0.08 in.).

internlocking hearts.jpg
Interlocking Part Example

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Enclosed Part Example

Color

Color parts can be achieved either by coloring models with 3D Sprint’s robust Paint tool, or by importing an already textured/colored file. 3D Sprint accepts multiple color file formats for import, including, but not limited to: .OBJ, .WRL, and the new 3D Printing standard .3MF. If you have uploaded your color model properly, the colors will appear in the 3D render in 3D Sprint. Those imported color files can be changed or added to with the 3D Sprint Paint tool. There are also three different color modes in 3D Sprint that will change how colors are depicted in your build. See more information on all of this in the printer's User Guide and the 3D Sprint Help Menu.

Red-Blue.JPGPrimary-Secondary.JPG